Friday, February 13, 2009

The Bugs

I think the bugs are dying. Been reading all about the Honey Bees disappearing, now the big rig drivers are saying they can go 250 miles with nary a bug on the windscreen. It sort of frightens me to think that this might be the beginning of something big. Something that humanity cannot control, no matter how much we seek to control it.

It just makes me think of that book, The World Without Us, the one about what Earth will be like when human beings disappear (which we will). That is a scary mother of a concept. Actually, it's not so much a concept as an actuality. One which I would love to ignore, but now that the bugs are dying...well, you know.

It also makes me think of The Planet of The Apes. The utter alien-ness of the Earth in that film freaked me out as a kid. I have a very distinct memory of lying on my grandparents' couch, covered in chicken pox, my heart palpitating at the image of the Statue Of Liberty's head buried in the sand. The idea of being alive when everyone you've ever loved was dead and buried was very unsettling to me in my chicken pox haze. I didn't like it one little bit.

The end of humanity in book and movie form. They both are frightening.

Although, I imagine that when we do finally die out, the bugs will come back. In droves.

Well, at least I would if I were them.

25 comments:

  1. This is a very unsettling blog. Some bugs are okay. I'm the freakish kid who had a pet praying mantis once. To this day its my favorite insect.

    I hope no one ever has to live after everyone who means something to them dies. It breaks my heart to think of it. But of course, you know that feeling too. The thoughts and dreams.

    Amanda

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  2. Did you watch that "Life After People" special on Discovery last year? That freaked me out yet fascinated me at the same time.

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  3. I just now realized that my post was made under the wrong account. My apologies. Life After People freaked me out too. Big time.

    Amanda

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  4. I do remember that Life After People special. It did make the point that after 10 or 20 millennia, virtually every sign on Earth that humanity ever existed will be erased.

    However, as I recall, they did overlook a few items, such as the artifacts left on the Moon by the Apollo missions, the Voyager spacecraft that have more or less left the solar system, and the various radio and television transmissions that have been leaving at lightspeed for decades.

    Someone, somewhere, will know and remember us.

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  5. The thought of life without people who mean something to me is the scariest thing. My biggest fear possibly.

    Just read about the bees from the link...very very peturbing stuff...

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  6. It makes me think of the latest season of Doctor Who myself. I'll just pretend that the bees and other insects are going back to their home planets.

    But I agree with you. It really is a scary thought. We really have disrupted nature a whole lot.

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  7. Hi Amber. I'm not sure if you remember me or not, but we met at Comic Con. My name is Calin, and I'm a professor of English in New Jersey. You indicated that if I left you my contact information you would send me an e-mail as I had a couple of writing and teacherly kind of questions I wanted to ask you. Anyway, I'm in no rush or anything, so please take your time. You can get ahold of me at cgrajko@camdencc.edu

    I look forward to hearing from you. Thank you again for being so accommodating. I had a great time meeting you and all the other wonderful people at Comic Con. This blog is great, and I'm adding it to my bookmarks right away. Keep up the great writing.

    Cheers,
    Calin

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  8. I'm very very sad about the bugs. I remember the year that I noticed the lack of bees around the garbage cans when summer came around. Besides the fact that we won't last long after the bugs are gone...I just like the bugs!

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  9. this reminds me of chance..."I'm scared of the dead bugs. They don't die a natural death, something kills them."
    how long have you been worried about the bugs?? haha i agree with you though all life has value, even the little bugs

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  10. People still don't seem to understand that most of our food depends on bugs, in one way or another.

    Watching "Planet of the Apes" is one of my earliest memories; I still remember the chill I got when the Statue of Liberty was revealed.

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  11. Watching these end of the world apocalyptic things leaves me cold and depressed. They serve as cautionary tales. fine. But do they have to be so gosh darn depressing. Anyone made a musical about the world ending.
    Anyway.
    Coming from a continent (Afrique du Sud) South Africa, that has wildlife teeming all over the place. (You will never get the full impact of a word like Teem, until you've seen life in Africa....teeming.) What you've got to understand is that ecosystems, biomes and all that stuff that end is -ology, tend to find a balance with it's environment.
    What this means in the case of our trucker, is that the bugs are not on hid windscreen, they're in the cab.
    They've moved into your house and they've adapted and made themselves comfortable and have found a balance with our urban environment.
    And then once balance has been achieved....they're eaten by the cockroaches.
    So where have all the bugs gone...they're being consumed en masse by the greatest bug of all....the cockroach.

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  12. Myself, I keep on thinking about Silent Spring.

    (Hallo, by the way. シ I've been enjoying your new blog.)

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  13. Dear Amber, thanks for your blog, and giving your fans the opportunity to connect with you.

    On the subject of bees and insects, the fact is that man can not survive without insects but insects can survive just fine without man. Says it all really. It would be fascinating to travel to the future when man is no longer around; where the great herds of the past once more roam the planes and flocks of birds are so big they block out the sun and blacken the sky.

    I also love that whole idea of the earth claiming what we have made, we did after all rape the earth in order to surround ourselves with needless things. I am just as guilty of that as anyone else I should add.

    I did not see the programme you refer to but I am an avid watcher of natural history documentaries. The BBC (or was it Channel 4? Hmm) made a great docu. recently mapping what would happen in five/ten/one hundred years etc. were man to disappear as of now.

    It used the area around Chernobyl (sp?) as a living (the irony) example of how the earth would react to such an event. It then progressed the idea, through the magic of television, and took it forward x amount of years. The visuals were stunning, you know the type of thing, flora covering New York, Tokyo overrun by bamboo etc. That, I would love to see. It was simply beautiful and it demonstrated the power of nature and how it will always win the day. My hope is that we don't kill the planet before nature has a chance to take it back and renew it.

    Don't get me wrong, I am surrounded by a huge, fantastic family and a group of friends that I love dearly. The idea of losing any one of them is devastating to me - it has happened in the past and it was not pretty. But, that is a personal, subjective reaction.

    Objectively, I understand that none of us are more than a grain of sand and in the grand scheme of things none of us actually matter. I am no expert but if memory serves, the earth has five billion(ish) years left before it's expiry date and whether man is around or not (which it won't be) it would be powerless to stop it's demise as that is when the sun will explode. It would be good if man left the earth alone sufficiently to see out those five billion years. It is also the natural order of things for species to die out - eventually they all do/will. We are merely hastening our demise by our treatment of our home.

    I could go on and on about this but I am not immune to the fact that you may actually stumble upon it and in a fit of lunacy see fit to read it.

    Ultimately, I rejoice in the beauty that man is uniquely capable of creating, and wish fervently that the ruling classes were made up of those who would treat their fellows and the earth with respect and dignity. But those type of people are not generally sociopathic, power-hungry, greedy bastards are they?

    Evolution has gone mad and we have been blessed with our huge brains and what did we do with them.......? I will leave you to fill in the blanks.

    Apologies for banging on and thanks for reading.

    Oh, one more thing, I love the original Planet of the Apes.

    Peace and love
    ForeverChanges

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  14. I have never seen "The Planet Of The Apes" or read the book you mentioned (although I am now intrigues and will be checking if my local library has it) so my comment is really only about the article about the bees.
    Initially my brain started to come up with various theories about what could be killing the bees but then i thought to myself; are the bees actually dying off?
    After re-reading the article it seems to me that the bees themselves aren't necessarily declining but more that they are rejecting the human built habitats that they have been inhabiting. It says near the beginning of the article that the bees are simply flying away and not returning. My knowledge of bees is pretty limited but could this not mean that they are simply starting up new colonies or joining other already established colonies elsewhere? Is this a case of nature saying a big 'take a hike' to mankind's interference in their lives with the bees choosing to abandon their man-made homes to go off and create their own?
    I find it misleading that the article chooses to refer to the bees as dying out when (in my opinion at least) the bees are simply re-locating.

    I wonder if we will all be reading an article in a few months time about an increase in the population of honey bees elsewhere.

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  15. If the bugs return in myriads it will only mean that the ecosystem would be extremely different therefor resulting to several mutations in each species and an increase in each of the ecosystem's sectors.
    Our planet endures self imposed changes every day , the sad thing is that man has accelerated not its transformation into something different yet viable but its decay .

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  16. LoL finally, after downloading 3 (!) different new webbrowsers I can comment:

    Aw sweety, please don't drive yourself crazy ok?
    If things get too scary with all the thinking that pretty head of yours is doing just snuggle up close to your boyfriend and try to ignore it for a while, I bet that helps ;)

    Can't do much more about it anyway. It's the curse of inteligence, understanding stuff that's frightening but unchangeable.

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  17. ooooh.... the end of "The Evil Dead: Army of Darkness"!!! post-apocalyptic future can be scary ...

    btw, whenever i step on an ant and kill it (accidently) i always say: "I'm sorrrrry"

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  18. Maybe... just maybe... the bugs aren't dying out. Maybe the bugs, with all their bug-y wisdom are hiding away, biding their time, building up some sort of bug battalion to take over the world. Thus, you know, the whole imminent end to humanity thing.

    Or one could be logical and agree with you, and concede that maybe the bugs are just disappearing because mankind likes to use cell phones. >_<

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  19. What's the scariest? That there was and will be a world without humans, or that mankind is doomed? That one day there will be no more humans, or that the last humans will see themselves extinguish yet another specie (their own)?
    Or worse, that there was a time when there was no Solar System, let alone Earth, and one day there will be no more Solar System, let alone Earth?
    All of this is scary.
    I'd rather agree with Beck and say the bugs are hiding away. Conspiracing with other species such as honey bees. And squirrels. To take over the world. Oh and of course the mosquitos are already trying.
    All of this, if you ask me, is Brain's fault. No really, all of these (failed) plot to take over the world! Well bugs, mosquitos, honey bees... they all watched Brain & Pinky's adventures and now they want to try too!
    Maybe it's just that the bugs understood (at long last) that highways were dangerous. Now they take the train.
    Now Missy stop scaring yourself, no more Discovery Channel or talk with big rig drivers. No more watching of movies where you can recognize the USA only by some Liberty Statue (that's a great piece of art, very strong, always the last thing left in the USA in those books and movies! Sorry but patriotic pride attacks me) lying on a beach or something alike (havn't watched The Planet of The Apes in a long time).
    Where will you buy your future house, Mars or Venus?

    :)

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  20. Oooh, it does remind me of the latest season of Doctor Who, too. After they made all those comments about the bees disappearing ("oh, that IS weird.")

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  21. The Word Without Us was a really interesting read, the idea that the legacy of the human race would continue for millions of years after out demise was disturbing. I agree with drjon it had for me the impact of Silent Spring. Worryingly included the longest lasting of our legacy will be the man-made chemicals and plastics that we use up and throw away as rubbish – does that not say something about us as humans? Surely the only inheritance we would want to leave with our passing is the accumulated knowledge that we have developed over the last 30,000 years, so future species would not need to make our mistakes? Would that be a more useful epitaph than a few plastic bags and rusting automobiles? The place that we have set ourselves at the table of this world is perhaps a little grandiose - alas for the bees, they were our friends, and although we abused their friendship, I doubt they will be the last species to be irradiated by our ignorant flailing amongst the Eden that used to be Earth.

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  22. Hi Amber, I'm Laura from Italy.I'm one of your most affectionate fans.Even if some of your movies are unknown in Italy,I've watched Chance and Race you to te bottom,apart from Buffy naturally! I think you and Alyson have given birth to one of the most beautiful,charming,lovely and unforgettable relationships ever seen on tv.Every time I see you two on Buffy,I feel myself touched straight to the heart.Thank you for everything you go on giving me throught your work, not only as an actress but also as a singer and writer...PS:I hope my English is correct enough to make you really understand what I mean...

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